No banner in farm
V8Central Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Active Polls | Members | Search | FAQ | Links | Private Messages
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 General Topics
 General chit-chat
 Baby boomers

Note: You must be registered in order to post a reply.
To register, click here. Registration is FREE!

Screensize:
UserName:
Password:
Format Mode:
Format: BoldItalicizedUnderlineStrikethrough Align LeftCenteredAlign Right Horizontal Rule Insert HyperlinkInsert EmailInsert Image Insert CodeInsert QuoteInsert List
   
Message:

* HTML is OFF
* Forum Code is ON
Smilies
Angry [:(!] Apprve [^] Big Smile [:D] Black Eye [B)]
Blush [:I] Clown [:o)] Cool [8D] Dead [xx(]
Disapprove [V] Eight Ball [8] Evil [}:)] Kisses [:X]
Poke tongue [tongue] Question [?] Sad [:(] Shock [:O]
Shy [8)] Sleeping [sleep] Sleepy [|)] Smile [:)]
Tongue [:P] Wink [;)]    

Tags:
  Check here to include your profile signature.
Check here to subscribe to this topic.
    

T O P I C    R E V I E W
Trickyonne Posted - 27 Nov 2019 : 18:05:01
https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/federal-budget/we-earned-this-boomer-bonus-bleeding-the-rest-of-us-dry/news-story/8c270d0c07e7e939b3ac9272ac8a168b

No shock there then .......
15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Zac Posted - 05 Feb 2020 : 12:50:31
All of Trev's post is reasonably true (allowing for the poetic licence), except that us baby-boomers are as guilty of adapting to and using all these 'advances' as all the Gen X, Gen Y, millenials and any other generations are. Not only that, but we are responsible for not only pushing for them, but inventing a lot of them and then advertising and marketing them. Also, before we try and imagine a rosy picture of how ecologically responsible we were "back then": We hardly knew the meaning of the word "recycle", we drove big, thirsty, polluting cars that got bigger and thirstier and more polluting every year, we "burnt off" everything we could in incinerators, and we ripped stuff out of the ground as fast as we possibly could, and threw out stuff we no longer needed on the tip, as well as polluting water and air with all kinds of rotten, poisonous things.

OTOH, we are as equally likely as the newer generations to be adapting to the newer waves of technology that reduce power usage and reduce our dependence on non-renewable sources of power.
falcon_cobra Posted - 05 Feb 2020 : 09:08:40
love it
Trev Posted - 05 Feb 2020 : 08:49:32
It tickled my fancy, mainly due to the accuracy of it. I did have it earmarked for another thread but you spoilt it for me
Legendary Gerry Posted - 05 Feb 2020 : 08:35:41
I loved that the first time I saw it a few years ago.
Trev Posted - 05 Feb 2020 : 07:53:32
Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment. The woman apologised to the young girl and explained, "We didn't have this 'green thing' back in my earlier days."

The young clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations."

The older lady said that she was right our generation didn't have the "green thing" in its day.

The older lady went on to explain:

Back then, we returned milk bottles, lemonade bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.

But we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day. Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But, too bad we didn't do the "green thing" back then. We walked up stairs because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the "green thing" in our day.

Back then we washed the baby's nappies because we didn't have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 240 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days.

Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day.

Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Victoria.

In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us.

When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn petrol just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power.

We exercised by working and walking so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right; we didn't have the "green thing" back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a plastic cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water.

We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the "green thing" back then.

Back then, people took a tram or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their mums into a 24-hour taxi service in the family's $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the "green thing."

We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 kilmeters out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the "green thing" back then?
Legendary Gerry Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 17:01:26
quote:
Originally posted by troy01505

3 x 4 hour shifts a week he has been doing plus he is staying at school, he apparently will get longer shifts and more often but I値l be fair at $20 if he stays in school but if he leaves then I値l hit it hard.



Fair enough!
troy01505 Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 15:50:52
3 x 4 hour shifts a week he has been doing plus he is staying at school, he apparently will get longer shifts and more often but I値l be fair at $20 if he stays in school but if he leaves then I値l hit it hard.
Trev Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 13:05:36
quote:
Originally posted by Legendary Gerry

$20 is cheap rent these days Troy!
I had to pay $20 a fortnight to my parents in the 60s!
I was only earning $30 a fortnight!

early to mid '70's, $20 per week board to live at home out of $35 a week income.
Muz Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 11:57:59
quote:
Originally posted by Trev

How many millennials still live at home sponging off their parents while holding down a job and NOT contributing to the running of the house? That is the question that burns me. Then they ****ing whinge about what a bunch of pricks baby-boomers are, all the time milking the teat that feeds them

We kicked the last of our 4 children out when he was 23 and sponging off us, he was told by his mother that he would not be living with us on his 24th birthday, he moved out a week before - he now claims, at 35 it was the best thing that happened. The other 3 moved out of their own choice prior to that, we have had a couple come back for short periods when they needed to, but they contributed to the running of the house - that is the rule



Yeh I agree with that. I think you might find though, there are more not doing that than you think...or maybe I知 in a different crowd. But, on the same page here.
Legendary Gerry Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 11:13:43
$20 is cheap rent these days Troy!
I had to pay $20 a fortnight to my parents in the 60s!
I was only earning $30 a fortnight!
troy01505 Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 11:06:58
quote:
Originally posted by Trev

How many millennials still live at home sponging off their parents while holding down a job and NOT contributing to the running of the house? That is the question that burns me. Then they ****ing whinge about what a bunch of pricks baby-boomers are, all the time milking the teat that feeds them

We kicked the last of our 4 children out when he was 23 and sponging off us, he was told by his mother that he would not be living with us on his 24th birthday, he moved out a week before - he now claims, at 35 it was the best thing that happened. The other 3 moved out of their own choice prior to that, we have had a couple come back for short periods when they needed to, but they contributed to the running of the house - that is the rule



I agree, to many are now babies and breast fed until they are 40.

I think it says more about the parent and what they let their child get away with. My wife and myself are both classed as millennials, I was working at 15 and so was my wife, we now have 2 business and I also have a job I must be attached too. I left home at 16 her 18 but have paid our own way since commencing work. Our eldest 2 boys (1 biological and 1 foster child but treated as equals) are 15 and 16, the 16 year old was told he has 6 months to get a job or he値l get the bare essentials and that is it. Limited meals, internet and electronics and if they don稚 follow then I値l cut the power. Wife said it was to harsh, he started work at KFC 6 weeks later and does 3 shifts week, he has been told to save for a car and we値l match it dollar for dollar and charge him 20 bucks to live here. We値l now do this to you each and every child in our care.

I know there are many in my age bracket that are ****ed up, babied and even some that should of been aborted but same goes with Boomers so not sure why you blokes feel attacked when spoken about as a whole. Obviously you all are not like it just a majority same with millennials.
Trev Posted - 22 Dec 2019 : 06:15:54
How many millennials still live at home sponging off their parents while holding down a job and NOT contributing to the running of the house? That is the question that burns me. Then they ****ing whinge about what a bunch of pricks baby-boomers are, all the time milking the teat that feeds them

We kicked the last of our 4 children out when he was 23 and sponging off us, he was told by his mother that he would not be living with us on his 24th birthday, he moved out a week before - he now claims, at 35 it was the best thing that happened. The other 3 moved out of their own choice prior to that, we have had a couple come back for short periods when they needed to, but they contributed to the running of the house - that is the rule
Muz Posted - 21 Dec 2019 : 20:46:35
I think that most people agree that every generation had had their challenges and people that work hard. However, the grinding point for many millennials is the assumption that they池e selfish and not hard working and all this from previous generations. That痴 a really narrow view and millennials (like plenty it seems on here) worked **** jobs when we were younger. Since I was 15 I致e had a job, nothing glamorous and rarely had 蘇olidays especially as a uni student as I needed to work and save money outside of uni time. I, like many of my peers at uni, wasn稚 even eligible for these government handouts we are so boldly told others are paying taxes for, because we worked too much and earned too much in our part time jobs!

On top of that, we got our education (and we池e paying for it) and now we池e chasing jobs that we want. Yes, they池e not the jobs that some believe we should be doing. But hey, we went and got our qualifications and now there is demand for what we want to do - why wouldn稚 we chase that? It痴 not selfishness, it痴 simple supply and demand.
tommo11 Posted - 21 Dec 2019 : 17:38:21
quote:
Originally posted by CP

quote:
Originally posted by tommo11

quote:
Originally posted by oldtimer

quote:
BABY BOOMERS COULD BE THE ANSWER TO AUSTRALIA担 YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT WOES


Quite apart from the fact that as Boomers retire, that opens jobs for younger Australians, many jobs will be available taking care of us in our dotage.

But, as seems usual, the Government will probably have to allow importation of workers to take the jobs that young Aussies will not do.

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/the-feed/baby-boomers-could-be-the-answer-to-australia-s-youth-unemployment-woes

A malicious lie.

These workers get brought in because they are cheaper and easy to exploit. Many young workers are either turned away, or discouraged from working on vineyards, cafes etc. I work in Margaret River, I know this for a fact.



I am a young person who works with slightly younger people than me. I can see why some get turned away from those lines of work.

There are plenty of deadbeats our age, sure. This isn稚 exclusive to people our age though.

I was hopeless at any job I attempted until I turned 21, thankfully I had an employer willing to help me shave the rough edges off.
troy01505 Posted - 21 Dec 2019 : 11:22:28
quote:
Originally posted by Legendary Gerry

quote:
Originally posted by troy01505

****ty jobs in aged and disability car are vacant because of the certification required! No young person can afford to pay ridiculous rent to pay boomers 2nd, 3rd or 4th houses off to study! Who壇 want to live in a car or on the street, eat noodles or dry bread and wear rags to gain a cert 4 qualification to wipe Angry old ****s asses and turn them every half hour?

Unskilled labor is another story. Big companies auction off positions to immigrants seeking the Australian way of life! This fills positions, raises unemployment and obviously locals suffer! Immigrants do more for less!



Boomers 2nd, 3rd and 4th houses?

You need to do some research and see who actually owns a number of houses.
Your apparent biassed hate of anything baby boomer doesn't help your arguments.

I am a proud boomer and have never owned more than one house at a time.
By the way, uni students eating 2 min noodles is not a new trend...

Oh, I don't get anything from the government either and have been retired for 7 years now.

Every age sectional group has the haves and have nots, have those who do and those who don't. It's a disappointingly narrow view to blame one section for all your woes.



It痴 great you are a proud boomer, but not so great that your not one of the lucky ones but I hope you are a happy boomer as we rarely see that these days with how angry the world is getting

I am a long way from any problem I mentioned, I don稚 have the stomach to wipe old people痴 asses

I just hope by the time my generation comes to retirement age or the near death bracket that things are as easy as they are now because the way it痴 looking we値l have no help, no benefits, no carers and no cheap old fart homes left.

I disagree with your opinion that I have a narrow view and I blame one generation, their are numerous generations to blame and there are angry selfish bastards in all of them but this topic is about boomers.

V8Central Forums © 2001 - 2020 V8Central Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.41 seconds.